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1 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I98)
 
2 (1911) resident @ 54 Meredith Road Devonport
 
SERLE, Henry Albert (I97)
 
3 (5b 648) Family F69
 
4 (Christened by Chaplain Reeves) BROWNESS, George "The Enigma" (I976)
 
5 (Medical): (i.e. "consumption" or pulmonary tuberculosis) HOW, Mary Ann Ellen (I989)
 
6 (Medical): (i.e. "consumption" or pulmonary tuberculosis) BROCK, Samuel (I990)
 
7 (Medical):A Near Brush with Death

In 1897, Arthur Brawnis became gravely ill from an epidemic of "fever" that struck many of the boys on the Reform School-Ship "Cornwall" (moored on the Thames off Purfleet) on which he was an Inmate. Originally thought by the staff to be ec fever, the Ship's Medical Inspector, Mr Mortimer de Brent, determined the disease - which ultimately killed one of those stricken - to more likely have been trichinosis, a parasitic infection. A subsequent government Inquiry, exhumation and forensic investigation by Mr W.H. Power confirmed this assessment and eventually lead to changes in food preparation procedures on board.

At the beginning of the outbreak, the "Cornwall" (which had previously served as an 74-gun "Third Rate" warship but by then lay at moorings in the Thames off Purfleet), had a complement of "262 boys, and 15 officers. The age of the boys d from 12 to 20 years." [Report, App. A, No.6, p.47] "On Tuesday, 23rd September, seven boys [including Arthur Brawnis] reported themselves to the medical officer of the ship for the sick list and were admitted to the sick-bay. Setting aside one trivial case, six boys suffered thenceforward from an illness that lasted 18 days in a fatal case, and 26 [Arthur], 37, 38, 42, and 88 days in cases that recovered." Over the subsequent days, 36 more cases were reported and treated.

Not surprisingly, the symptoms were rather gruesome and in addition to the full range of pronounced gastric problems that one might expect, they included abdominal pain, sweating, brownish-white, "furry" tongue, blood in the stools, elevateperatures and pulse (Arthur's reached 103° and 111 respectively) and cases of roseola spots, jaundice, delirium, pneumonia, deafness and hair loss! In addition, "Three boys had epistaxis [nosebleed]; one, Brawnis, had it severely, but he was subject to it when well." [Report, App. A, No.6, p.65]

Other Information on Arthur Brawnis from the Report:
* Arthur and Richard Pierce (the boy who died) were the same age and messmates (Mess 15), both sharing the Starboard Watch and both members of the 13th Division. [Report, App. A, No.6, table on p.50];
* Arthur's bunk was on the "Main Deck, forward, ship's side". [ibid];
* Arthur had not been "from the ship for many weeks previous" [Report, App. A, No.6, p.51], in fact from the table cited above, it appears that neither he nor Richard Pierce had been on leave in the year preceding the outbreak; and
* He was not a "newcomer" (one of those joining the ship between July and September) to the "Cornwall" [ibid], so his time there had started in June 1859 or earlier.

"Trichiniasis," [to quote the online edition of Stedman's Medical Spellchecker, ©2006 Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, is:] "A parasite of carnivorous mammals that causes trichinosis. It is especially common in rats and in swine fed uncooked garbage. Human infection is initiated by the consumption of raw or insufficiently cooked pork or other meat." The disease consists of an "infestation by trichina larvae that are transmitted by eating inadequately cooked meat (especially pork); larvae migrate from the intestinal tract to the muscles where they become encysted." The outbreak on the "Cornwall" was ultimately attributed to a batch of "American pork," exceptionally obtained from a firm in Bristol" and consisting "solely of belly pieces, and therefore of parts of many pigs, and of those parts most likely to be infected with trichina." [Report, App. A, No.6, p.53] The salt pork, typically boiled in 96-pound batches, had been inadequately cooked, and the parasites therein therefore survived and were transmitted to all the boys in the mess(es) where that batch of salt meat had been served.

Trivia: The "Cornwall", constructed of teak in Bombay, India, in 1815 had, in her first life, been HMS "Wellesley", a "3rd Rate" [warship] of 74 Guns. As the "Cornwall", she remained at her moorings well into the 20th Century, but sed the infamy of being sunk by the Luftwaffe (i.e. German Air Force) in 1940 during an air raid of London - the only known sinking of a wooden man-o'-war by an airplane! 
BROWNESS, Arthur Edwin (I985)
 
8 (Medical):Brown hair, grey eyes, pale complexion CHASTY, James (I992)
 
9 (Medical):Full description: "Asthenia due to bed sores following fracture of the right femur caused by an accidental fall in the yard at 6 Herbert Place, Devonport on 30th October 1923" SERLE, Amelia (I105)
 
10 At least one living or private individual is linked to this note - Details withheld. Living (I14)
 
11 (Research):Notes from Ian Browness:

1. Original death certificate for Orlando C. (1923 Q4 Plymouth) appears to have been ordered once, but no trace of it can be found. Needs to be re-ordered.

2. Emily's death is hard to pin-point, as maiden names are not provided on the indices. However, an Emily HOWE death has been located on the indices which looks quite promising: [CRI Death ( Index Only) ] HOWE, Emily [maybe WAKEHAM], Year/Quarter: 1932 Q1 Jan-Mar, Age 62 , District: Plymouth, County: Devonshire, Vol. 5b, p. 484 (FreeBMD)

3. Should access to old Plymouth newspapers ever be possible, an account of Samuel HOW's death on 15th November 1869 at East Stonehouse would be very valuable! 
HOW, Orlando Charles (I993)
 
12 (Research):Notes from Ian Browness:

1. Original death certificate for Orlando C. (1923 Q4 Plymouth) appears to have been ordered once, but no trace of it can be found. Needs to be re-ordered.

2. Emily's death is hard to pin-point, as maiden names are not provided on the indices. However, an Emily HOWE death has been located on the indices which looks quite promising: [CRI Death ( Index Only) ] HOWE, Emily [maybe WAKEHAM], Year/Quarter: 1932 Q1 Jan-Mar, Age 62 , District: Plymouth, County: Devonshire, Vol. 5b, p. 484 (FreeBMD) 
WAKEHAM, Emily Thirza (I994)
 
13 (Research):Notes from Ian Browness:

R1 (09Nov2008). Regarding possible marriages, searched the indices on FindMyPast.Com for Date range = Q1 1931 to Q4 1942, Last name = Higgins and First name = Ron. Only one result for a "Ron... W" emerged, in Surrey. SW which matches his family's earlier location. in Liverpool (unlikely). 
HIGGINS, Ronald Harry (I716)
 
14 (Research):Notes from Ian Browness:

R1. (2008-01) Surname spelling for this individual has been standardized to "BROWNESS" for ease of look-up within my master file and on Http://Browness.Net , although in many cases, the civil registration authorities and census takers of mid-1800's Kensington recorded it as "BROUNES" or some variant thereof. The specific surname spelling variation used by the authorities on any given record can, in most cases, be found in the specific source record citation for that individual's name. 
BROWNESS, George Robert (I849)
 
15 (Research):Research Notes from Ian Browness:

(1) Identifying Jane Emma's Birth Reg'n (Unproductive Research Note 2007-11): Browsed the full CRI register index scans on FindMyPast.Com, for each quarter between and including Q1 1845 and Q4 1851, for BRON*, BROU* and BROW* Browness variants, but could not see an explicit "Jane Emma" entry. (2) Re: Birth Reg'n (Unproductive Research Note 2007-11): Browsed the full register scans on FindMyPast.Com, for each quarter between and including Q1 1846 and Q4 1850, for FOSTER, but could not see an explicit "Jane Emma" entry.

(2) Children of Jane Emma. (Oct 2009) The children of Robert & Jane Emma shown in this file are well documented with the exception of Thomas (born and died 1890), who is only a probable child of Jane Emma's. In the Parish Register, Thomas' burial is entered on the line immediately preceding Jane Emma's and both are identically annotated "Acton | from the Union House", suggesting strongly he was Emma's child (the birth and loss of whom may have dealt the final blow to Jane Emma's already gruellingly hard life). However, the absence of a christening record (he died too early) would make obtaining an official birth registration a necessity if his parentage is to be confirmed. Jane Emma might possibly have had as many as three additional children in the decade preceding her death, possibly in an attempt to provide Robert with a son. The GRO CRI lists (per FreeBMD) these as: Name: Fred Joseph Mander, Year of Registration: 1885, Quarter of Registration: Jul-Aug-Sep, District: Brentford, County: Middlesex, Volume: 3a, Page: 135, Name: Ernest John Mander, Year of Registration: 1886, Quarter of Registration: Oct-Nov-Dec, District: Brentford, County: Middlesex, Volume: 3a, Page: 60, and Name: Amy Mander, Year of Registration: 1888, Quarter of Registration: Apr-May-Jun, District: Brentford, County: Middlesex, Volume: 3a, Page: 437. None of these three appears on the death indices in the years shortly following; however, none could be located on the 1891 Census either. 
FOSTER, Jane Emma (I979)
 
16 (Research):Research Notes from Ian Browness:

R1 Prior to discovering Annie Amelia's actual date of death, several incorrect remarriage/death leads were researched"

(13Apr2008): Had thought the following to be a possible 2nd marriage of Anne Amelia (Browness) Hollister [hence "Amelia B"]. However, the marriage certificate confirmed that it was not: [CRI Marriage (CERTIFIED but UNRELATED)] HOLLISTER, Aa B - UNKNOWN, 1911 Oct-Dec, District: Kensington, County: Middlesex, Vol. 1a, p.312 (FreeBMD) *In this Kensington marriage (17Dec1911 at Christ Church in Notting Hill), the bride was an Amelia Beatrice Hollister (c1887), age 24 ,("our" Anne Amelia's junior by 31 years!) who had inherited that surname by birth from her father Louis James Hollister, a blacksmith. The groom was Robert Shayler, age 28, a Carman.

(13Apr2008): Had also thought the following to be a possible 2nd marriage of Anne Amelia. However, once again the full marriage certificate showed this not to be the case: [CRI Marriage (CERTIFIED but UNRELATED)] HOLLISTER, Annie - UNKNOWN,6 Apr-Jun, District: Reading, County: Berkshire, Vol. 2c, p. 769 (FreeBMD) *This marriage (on 14Apr1906), at St Giles' Church in Reading was of a 19 year old spinster, the daughter of Edward Hollister, a fitter, who once again had passed along that surname to her by birth. The groom was John Charles Evans, age 23, a Cycle Engineer. 
BROWNESS, Anne Amelia (I981)
 
17 (Research):Research Notes from Ian Browness:

R1. (Unproductive Research): Family members are not buried in Kensal Green Cemetery. In 2007-01, contacted Marie Murphy, Cemetery Manager, by email, specifically asking about Frederick William, Amy Maria and Mary Ann Browness (née Foster), plus asked for a cursory check on Arthur Edwin. The Cemetery Manager advised 2007-01-18): "Dear Ian, thank you for your email. I have searched the burial registers and cannot find a record for any of the people you are looking for. I have forwarded your email to St Mary's cemetery which is next door to us in case they are buried there." *St Mary's, which appears to be Catholic, subsequently advised that none of the persons sought were buried there either. 
BROWNESS, Frederick William (I983)
 
18 (Research):Research Notes from Ian Browness:

R3. (Unproductive Research, 17Aug2009): Arthu's name could not be located in the online "Index to Criminal Depositions 1861-1885: Series ID 4508" (Queensland, AU) [see http://www.archives.qld.gov.au/downloads/Indexes/abbott-jones_ted.pdf ].

R2. (2008-10 re: Future Research / Time on The "Cornwall"): Arthur's mention in the Medical Report leads the way to some potentially valuable future research, specifically: (1) What do his "admission" and personal records (if any) from the "Cornwall" say about him? (2) Based on Arthur's records of admission, are there surviving court records covering his trial and sentencing that shed light on his whereabouts in the early 1870's? *He is not, it appears, in the Old Bailey online records. From the "Cornwall", are there any discharge or follow-up records that would point to where Arthur went afterwards?

* The Reformatory School-Ship "Cornwall" is sometimes referred to as a "borstal", which leads to some confusion. Wikipedia describes a borstal (very roughly equivalent to a North American "juvie" or juvenile detention center) as: "a specific kind of youth prison, run by the Prison Service and intended to reform seriously delinquent young people. The word is sometimes used, incorrectly, to apply to other kinds of youth institution or reformatory, such as Approved Schools and Detention Centres. The court sentence was officially called 'borstal training'. ...the first such institution was established at Borstal Prison in a village called Borstal, near Rochester in north Kent., England in 1902. The system was developed on a national basis and formalised in the Prevention of Crime Act 1908." However, reformaties and like institutions - the "Cornwall" being one - existed decades before that. The surviving records for the "Cornwall" (potentially holding more information on Arthur), appear to have been originally classed by The National (UK) Archives under Home Office Series "HO 37", but now may fall under "HO 45".

R1. (Unproductive Research, 2007-01): Family members are not buried in Kensal Green Cemetery. In 2007-01, contacted Marie Murphy, Cemetery Manager, by email, specifically asking about Frederick William, Amy Maria and Mary Ann Browness (née Foster), plus asked for a cursory check on Arthur Edwin. The Cemetery Manager advised 2007-01-18): "Dear Ian, thank you for your email. I have searched the burial registers and cannot find a record for any of the people you are looking for. I have forwarded your email to St Mary's cemetery which is next door to us in case they are buried there." *St Mary's, which appears to be Catholic, subsequently advised that none of the persons sought were buried there either. 
BROWNESS, Arthur Edwin (I985)
 
19 (Research):Research Notes:

R1. Re: Date and Particulars of DONEGAN-BROWNESS Marriage: On 24 Feb 2008 unsuccessfully leaved through all quarters between 1903 and 1923 in the UK CRI Marriage indices on FindMyPast, suggesting the marriage took place in Ireland. 
BROWNESS, Anne Elizabeth "Hanorah" (I852)
 
20 (Research):Unproductive Research Notes:

U1. Family members are not buried in Kensal Green Cemetery. In Jan 2007, contacted Marie Murphy, Cemetery Manager, by email, specifically asking about Frederick William, Amy Maria and Mary Ann Browness (née Foster), plus asked for a cursory check on Arthur Edwin. She advised 2007-01-18): "Dear Ian, thank you for your email. I have searched the burial registers and cannot find a record for any of the people you are looking for. I have forwarded your email to St Mary's cemetery which is next door to us in case they are buried there." *Full name of the latter: St Mary's Catholic Cemetery, Harrow Road Later correspondence from that second cemetery was, not too surprisingly, similarly unproductive. 
FOSTER, Mary Ann (I977)
 
21 *See Marriage Note re: witnesses at Browness-How (1880) wedding.

Notes from Stephen J. Browness [also posted to separate History entry on Browness.Net]:

1. (SJB e-mail extract): [George Browness (1814)] "died in Cirencester Workhouse on 28 March 1872 and was buried on 3 April. The very next day (4 April) George Robert joined the 23rd Royal Welch Fusiliers at Woolwich."

2. (SJB e-mail of 11Apr2007): "You asked about George Robert's service record. I don't have a photocopy but transcribed it at the PRO as follows:
* Joined 2nd Bat. Royal Welch Fusiliers 4th April 1872 at Woolwich [as I said earlier, the day after his father's burial]
* Home: 5th April 1872 to 20th November 1873
* 4th to 6th January 1873: Imprisoned for misconduct [!]
* West Coast of Africa: 21st November 1873 to 20th March 1874
* Home: 21st March 1874 to 16th October 1874
* Gibraltar: 17th October 1874 to 14th February 1880
* Home: 15th February 1880 to 14th December 1885
* India: 15th December 1885 to 30th November 1888
* Home: 1st December 1888 to 28th August 1891
* He fought in the Ashantee Campaign
* Medals: Long Service and Good Conduct Medal 1st January 1892
Authority Medal Branch (A.G.10) 13855
* Rank: Private until promoted to Lance Corporal on 7th April 1891
* Discharged: 28th August 1891
No doubt much of the Home postings were in Wales hence the birth locations of several of the next generation."
"I don't know much about his post-Army career. Pauley has him working in London in 1901 and Aunt Daisy used to say that he served in the Police force in London (though the Metropolitan Police have no record of this) and that he worked on tnstruction of Vauxhall Bridge over the Thames."

3. A rather unusual aside: Both sons Walter and Frederick recorded the name of their father (George Robert) on their marriage certificates as "George Henry" (?) 
BROWNESS, George Robert (I849)
 
22 13 Vulcan Road, Deptford, Greenwich  JARVIS, Mabel Louie (I16)
 
23 1825 Baptismal Register, Morice St Wesleyan Church, Town of Plymouth Dock, Parish of Stoke Damerel, Plymouth, Devon. SERLE, Alfred (I100)
 
24 1841 Census - Eastcott (Farm ??)
1861 Census shows him as 'Farmer of 90 acres' Eastcott. Aged (54) b1807.
1871 Census -Now aged 64 shown as 'Farmer of 90 acres' Eastcott. also shows him as having a domestic servant.
BMD deaths Q4 1880 Liskeard 5c 41
Christened 04/12/1807 IGI St Mellion P002041, shows parents as John HAWK & Ann 
HAWK, John Reed (I426)
 
25 1841 Census : resident @ Port Hill , nuffield parish, Henley. JARVIS, Thomas (I404)
 
26 1841 census Occ. Sone Mason living in William St. Morice Town, Devonport, Plymouth, Devon.
1851 census Occ. Baker living @ 21 William Street, Morice Town, Devonport, Plymouth, Devon. 
OLVER, Thomas (I374)
 
27 1841 census shows address as Tavistock Street, Stoke Damerel, Plymouth, Devon. PAIN(E), John (I423)
 
28 1841 census shows living in Marlborough Street, Morice, Stoke Damerel, Plymouth, Devon... SERLE, William (I421)
 
29 1851 census = Walsham Le Willows WOODS, Richard (I559)
 
30 1851 census records him as a Farmer of 37 acres employing 2 labourers. Uphill in the parish of Linkinhorne.
1861 census records him now as a Farmer of 90 acres employing 2 labourers and 2 boys. Polbilsa Stoke Lane, Northill, Launceston, Cornwall.
Thomasine shows up on this census aged 15 
PENGELLY, Richard (I438)
 
31 1851 census shows Eliza aged about 33 this means that she was born 1819/1819 at Stoke Damerel, Plymouth, Devon...
BMD Eliza SERLE death (62) Jun 1881 Stoke D 5b 206 
PAINE, Eliza (I101)
 
32 1851 Census shows his occupation as Labourer HM board of ordnance. OLVER, John (I141)
 
33 1851 Census shows residing at 5 Keyham Point, Devonport, Plymouth, Devon. OLVER, John (I141)
 
34 1851 shows his father John Clements Widower & Pauper living with them CLEMENTS, Robert (I175)
 
35 1861 - 44 yrs old UNNAMED (I129)
 
36 1861 Census 'Farmers son' (25) residing @ Eastcott Callington/Liskeard
1871 Census 'Landowner' (36) living Saltash Road.
1881 Census John Reed not on this return.
1891 Census
1911 census shows him staying with Sydney Talbot and family who married his daughter Jenny Hawke. BMD shows death Q4 1915 Hawk John R Aged 80 (5c 58) 
HAWK, John Reed (I106)
 
37 1861 census living "Summerhill" Cranbrook/Hawkhurst HODGKIN, Albert (I532)
 
38 1861 Census resident @ Waterloo Place, Alderbury, Britford. TATUM, William Wyndham (I739)
 
39 1861 census resident Soke Damerel
1871 census resident Gillingham, Kent.
1901 census resident on Residential ship "Chalenger" HMD Chatham 
OLVER, George Andrew (I145)
 
40 1861 census shows him as an Agricultural Labourer CLEMENTS, Stephen (I131)
 
41 1861 census shows him as an Agricultural Labourer CLEMENTS, James (I135)
 
42 1861 census shows him as an Agricultural Labourer CLEMENTS, George (I136)
 
43 1861 census shows him as an Agricultural Labourer CLEMENTS, Adam (Alfred) Line (I137)
 
44 1861 census shows him as working with his father as a Labourer on the Highway. CLEMENTS, John (I134)
 
45 1861 census shows residing at 9 Ker St.
1851 census shows a girl child born 1850 (1 year old) 
SERLE, Alfred (I100)
 
46 1861 lived 2 Camden Cottages, Quarry Road, Tunbridge Wells KING, Rhoda (I554)
 
47 1871 census Occ. Pot Boy JARVIS, William (I411)
 
48 1871 census Occ General Domestic servant,Clarence Place, Gravesend, Kent. E, Frances (Fanny) OSMOTHERLY?? (I379)
 
49 1871 Census Occ. Pot Boy JARVIS, Frederick (I412)
 
50 1871 Census shows resident @ Bray, Berkshire.
1881 Census shows him aged 13 living with parents @ 3 Sydenham Place, Maidenhead, Berkshire.

Birth Wycombe 3a 435
Loudwater, Buckinghamshire.

Loudwater is a hamlet in the parish of Chepping Wycombe in Buckinghamshire, England. It is located in the valley to the east of the main town, on the A40 London Road. The hamlet name refers to the River Wye nearby, that also flows through High Wycombe. Its literal meaning is 'noisy water'. In manorial records in 1241 the hamlet was referred to as La Ludewatere.
 
JARVIS, George (I123)
 

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